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Codes & Clues

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  • #46
    Originally posted by MrsSleuth View Post
    I'm confused about the school aspect - Do schools have tablets that kids can use? I can't imagine there would be one for every kid though. And I can't see them assigning it as homework because you can't assume every kids would have a tablet at home.
    The teacher could use one and connect it to the big screen/smartboard, sort of like a Let's Play.

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    • #47
      You would actually be surprised at how many ipads/tablets are in schools today. Even if there isn't one for every kid the program can be used for when the kids have free time or have finished all their work. Or even if it was assigned a teacher could set aside time for the students to do it at school. I learned typing because of a computer program that I was allowed to use at school after all my work was done. Of course I went to a really small school but the potential is still there.

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      • #48
        I remember in my middle school and high school there were a few laptop carts full of laptops that would be requested by teachers so we could use computers in class for the day. In elementary school there were a few computers in the back of the classroom and I actually remember we were allowed to play computer games during indoor recess days. Educational games of course! Students using tablets in the classroom doesn't seem too far fetched to me.

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        • #49
          Kinda random but I didn't know what other thread to post it on..I was just looking at the Codes & Clues youtube channel and noticed that, while having barely any subscribers or views on most of their videos, there are two vids (which are both trailers) that have 20-30k views -- but still only have like 20 likes and 0 comments. Soooo I would guess they paid for fake views? Which seems kind of...low. I mean, who knows, maybe they've been doing stuff like that for years, buuut it just seems like in the last few years HeR has done a lot of stuff that just seems a bit...lacking as much integrity as they used to have, faking views being the latest thing I've noticed? Idk.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by AutumnMemories View Post
            Kinda random but I didn't know what other thread to post it on..I was just looking at the Codes & Clues youtube channel and noticed that, while having barely any subscribers or views on most of their videos, there are two vids (which are both trailers) that have 20-30k views -- but still only have like 20 likes and 0 comments. Soooo I would guess they paid for fake views? Which seems kind of...low. I mean, who knows, maybe they've been doing stuff like that for years, buuut it just seems like in the last few years HeR has done a lot of stuff that just seems a bit...lacking as much integrity as they used to have, faking views being the latest thing I've noticed? Idk.
            I think the trailer with 20,000 was linked in their press release and probably got seen the most, for ex by press, reviewers, when they did the trade show circuit, b2b buyers (like schools). To be honest, 20,000 over 6 months for the release of a new game division is pretty low and shows how little buzz there was around the game, and how little the company did to promote themselves. To contrast, Arglefumph did a funny "everything wrong with Nancy Drew" video on STFD which has 10,000 views in 2 months.

            The C&C FB page only has 49 likes, so it doesnt seem they are doing any marketing at all.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by paperstreet View Post
              I think the trailer with 20,000 was linked in their press release and probably got seen the most, for ex by press, reviewers, when they did the trade show circuit, b2b buyers (like schools). To be honest, 20,000 over 6 months for the release of a new game division is pretty low and shows how little buzz there was around the game, and how little the company did to promote themselves. To contrast, Arglefumph did a funny "everything wrong with Nancy Drew" video on STFD which has 10,000 views in 2 months.

              The C&C FB page only has 49 likes, so it doesnt seem they are doing any marketing at all.
              I think they're doing some marketing, just...poorly, in my opinion? For example, if you look at their twitter, the people they have most recently followed are mostly a ton of "mommy bloggers" and "stay at home moms" (so I guess they're trying to market to them). To be honest I kind of hate that they're marketing to stay at home moms now. What happened to Nancy Drew being empowering? I remember Megan Gaiser in the past talking about how the games first took off, and saying how all sorts of publishers rejected their games saying they needed to be pink and traditionally girly to get girls to play, but HeR took the opposite route, and that's why the games took off -- which is why I liked (and is still why I like) the games, they weren't traditionally feminine. Okay so teaching girls to code is empowering, but I don't know, it just feels kind of insulting that they're now marketing their games/collaborating with (in their twitter parties) "mommy bloggers". Maybe I'm making a big deal over nothing haha, but I just don't think that sort of marketing would be happening were Megan Gaiser still CEO. Also I don't see how following/working with/giving free copies to a few unknown sites/twitters with under 1000 followers (I've seen a few sites, youtube reviews. etc where they said HeR provided them a copy of the game) is going to help get Codes and Clues much attention

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              • #52
                Originally posted by AutumnMemories View Post
                I think they're doing some marketing, just...poorly, in my opinion? For example, if you look at their twitter, the people they have most recently followed are mostly a ton of "mommy bloggers" and "stay at home moms" (so I guess they're trying to market to them). To be honest I kind of hate that they're marketing to stay at home moms now. What happened to Nancy Drew being empowering? I remember Megan Gaiser in the past talking about how the games first took off, and saying how all sorts of publishers rejected their games saying they needed to be pink and traditionally girly to get girls to play, but HeR took the opposite route, and that's why the games took off -- which is why I liked (and is still why I like) the games, they weren't traditionally feminine. Okay so teaching girls to code is empowering, but I don't know, it just feels kind of insulting that they're now marketing their games/collaborating with (in their twitter parties) "mommy bloggers". Maybe I'm making a big deal over nothing haha, but I just don't think that sort of marketing would be happening were Megan Gaiser still CEO. Also I don't see how following/working with/giving free copies to a few unknown sites/twitters with under 1000 followers (I've seen a few sites, youtube reviews. etc where they said HeR provided them a copy of the game) is going to help get Codes and Clues much attention
                I'm going to gloss over the condescending tone towards women who choose to stay home and blog about family life. But I believe they would be marketing towards these types of people because the game is meant for children. Who else would they advertise to? The target age group for this game is far to young to have their own Facebook or Twitter accounts.

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by MrsSleuth View Post
                  I'm going to gloss over the condescending tone towards women who choose to stay home and blog about family life. But I believe they would be marketing towards these types of people because the game is meant for children. Who else would they advertise to? The target age group for this game is far to young to have their own Facebook or Twitter accounts.
                  This exactly^^
                  My daughter is still a toddler, and all she wants to do with the tablet is eat it, but I have bought and played codes and clues anyway (I liked it, btw), to find out if I want her playing it when she's older. Which I do. And I will be absolutely thrilled to introduce her to all the adventure games too.
                  I had no idea that, as a stay-at-home Mother, I should be excluded from all Nancy Drew marketing. I suppose, even though I grew up with them, as soon as I chose to raise children and take care of my home and husband, I should have tossed all my games because they are clearly not for me anymore.
                  Listen, my child, to this story of dreams,
                  And know that the beginning is more difficult than it seems.
                  When the ten daughters are reunited in order,
                  When the four-sided box loses its border,
                  When the eye of the phoenix is in your hand,
                  When the bird of fire can see again,
                  When the moon sleeps and the sun plays,
                  The king of the sky will shine his rays,
                  And hidden beneath a river of colors
                  Will lie a gate to golden wonders.


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