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  • ADrake
    replied
    Originally posted by BirdSeed View Post
    I was honestly so scared when I found out this game was about models and fashion.
    I was so scared to get it and play it because of the way people think that models and fashion should be.
    I was afraid for the young children that would be playing this. Knowing how impressionable they are. And the kind of impact someone/thing can have on them. Especially if that is a role model like Nancy Drew.

    I was pleasantly surprised. All of my worries were quickly resolved. All of my fears squashed when I met the characters. Especially JingJing.

    HerInteractive made this game incredible. So many things could have gone wrong. But nothing did.

    This game was incredible. And I am sure that it made a lot of people feel good about themselves. It gave a good message. Strong and beautiful.

    You don't have to be thin to be beautiful. You just have to be you.

    Thank you, HerInteractive~
    ADrake: This is in response to this post in 2012, it is now 2015. I understand your concerns for playing this game, as I had the same concerns about it when I played it years later at an older age. I have always been a fan of the Nancy Drew series and have played them since I was a young kid and will continue to. I however was not as thrilled as you were to re-play this game once I could better comprehend the values that were prevalent in this game. I can think of a few good examples of the stereotypical and offensive values in this game off the top of my head.

    The first being: the fact that they made a big deal of "JJ" being a "plus sized model" throughout the entire game. I understand that children need to know that people are beautiful no matter what size, and feel that should be the job of a parent or guardian of said child, but I felt like they made such a separation between plus sized models and other models, a child clearly would too unless there was an adult who could explain it to them otherwise that there is no need for a separation, even though Nancy the role model Drew as well as every other character in the game, seems to think there is. There should be and is, NO difference whether or not a model is large or small, short or tall, male or female and I don't think HeR Interactive did a good job making it clear that it doesn't and shouldn't matter what size you are or who you are.

    Second: I thought it was inappropriate and offensive to include the meaningless conversation between Nancy and the character 'Jean Mi' in which Nancy asks "why do you think Minette wears that mask" and he responds that he thinks its due to "botched plastic surgery". Instead of the ending there they continue to talk about the not only pointless but also offensive conversation where Nancy reply's "Don't you think Minette is a little young to be undergoing plastic surgery" when Jean Mi comes back with "some people (and I'm pretty sure says women, but not positive, and if so there is even more wrong with this situation) have noses that would put birds of prey to shame and are happy with their appearance, where others have perfectly 'acceptable' features and think they are more hideous than Frankenstein".

    Because of this sentence alone I am so surprised that no one had anything to say about it. Through all the controversial forum posts about Nancy Drew games and their plot lines, no one had anything to say about this one, really? Needless to say I was very surprised. Not only is this offensive and sending the wrong message to children and everyone else who plays the game. The worst part about it is as an adult I actually understand what HeR was loosely trying to convey by adding this seemingly futile conversation into the plot. I know that some people dislike or even hate the way they look and that no matter what anyone says or does it seems as though no one will change their mind. However saying that even though Minette is young "acceptably featured women" and living a seemingly "good" life she may still hate the way she looks therefore undergo plastic surgery because no one can convince her differently is a completely absurd thing to add into a game that children are meant to play, or any game for that matter. AS WELL adding in the fact that people have "acceptable" and "unacceptable" features is ridiculous, and not very kid friendly in my opinion. Children are very impressionable, and if I ever hear a kid telling someone else their big nose would put a bird of prey to shame, I'll know who to blame. Speaking from a standpoint where I can remember playing this as a young child and didn't have any adult playing with me to tell me what message they were trying to make out of that conversation, I know this had a negative effect on me.

    Third: I'll try and keep this one short. The conversation Nancy, Bess and George have on the phone. Nancy tells Bess and George that she is rooming with JJ Ling the model. One of the conversation points that you click on is Nancy saying " Minette needs JJ to be a size 12 for her latest collection, so she makes and eats chocolate chip cookies all day long in order to gain the 3 pounds needed to be the "perfect size 12". Bess goes on to say that " that can't be right, models don't eat cookies. I thought that was the only thing that made me superior to them." I understand that Bess's character is trying to "poke fun" at the beauty standard in saying "models don't eat cookies" and that George and Nancy's characters in this particular conversation are telling Bess that JJ does in fact eat cookies, and that she's being silly for thinking that models don't. However I think a child would mainly hear "that can't be right, models don't eat cookies." and not understand the sarcasm of the second half of the conversation where they are trying to make light of Bess's ridiculousness, take that into their subconscious and start thinking... models are to compete with, as well as are some kind of special, superior, and 100% different kind of person then I am, or anyone else who isn't a model. Which I feel is a very real problem that children and adults both face.

    All in all, I thought this game wasn't the right ND game for kids to play. I'm not sure if it's because it's an older game, or if it's because people think kids are a little less impressionable then they really are. But I thought most of this was handled irresponsibly if you take into account that children are playing this game.

    I was not trying to target anyone in particular with this post. I wanted to voice my opinion because I think the beauty standard is something that needs to change and is changing and I would like to see a more accurate representation of that from the HeR Interactive team. Please keep all comments regarding this post non-offensive if you have something to say.

    Thanks for reading. Let me know what you think.

    Leave a comment:


  • BirdSeed
    started a topic Perfect Size 12.

    Perfect Size 12.

    I was honestly so scared when I found out this game was about models and fashion.
    I was so scared to get it and play it because of the way people think that models and fashion should be.
    I was afraid for the young children that would be playing this. Knowing how impressionable they are. And the kind of impact someone/thing can have on them. Especially if that is a role model like Nancy Drew.

    I was pleasantly surprised. All of my worries were quickly resolved. All of my fears squashed when I met the characters. Especially JingJing.

    HerInteractive made this game incredible. So many things could have gone wrong. But nothing did.

    This game was incredible. And I am sure that it made a lot of people feel good about themselves. It gave a good message. Strong and beautiful.

    You don't have to be thin to be beautiful. You just have to be you.

    Thank you, HerInteractive~
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